Closing Costs Explained

Closing Costs Explained

 

In a typical Jackson Hole real estate transaction, here's what a buyer can expect to pay for closing costs:
 
Earnest Money Deposit: It is important to have an understanding of the earnest money deposit, so you will not be placed in an uncomfortable position when you purchase a property. At the time a written offer is initiated, you will be required by the seller to include a personal check, cashier's check, wired funds or cash. The amount is normally deposited into the designated title company's escrow account or the listing broker's trust account, upon the offer's acceptance, and will remain there until the time of closing. This amount is credited to you as a partial down payment and represents your intent to purchase the property. If the offer is not accepted, this amount is returned to you promptly. Depending on the price of the property, you should anticipate a minimum of a $1,000 earnest money deposit.  Note: If a buyer is unable to 
 
Title Insurance: When you purchase your home, you will receive a preliminary title commitment that will indicate exactly what recorded liens, encumbrances and recorded easements are currently in effect on the property. The title commitment will also indicate the vested owner of record and any restrictions on the use of the property. Title insurance is, for all practical purposes, required on all property in Teton County, and the cost is paid by the seller. 
 
The buyer pays for all inspections on the property, home and other improvements, as well as any other professional(s) the buyer shall hire.
 
Customarily the buyer and seller split the title company's closing fee, which is typically around $250 each. 
 
Property Taxes, homeowner's association fees, utilities, rents, etc., will be prorated to the date of closing. 
 
Mortgage/Lender Fees In Addition to the Fees Listed Above
 
Here is an overview of the types of closing costs you may incur on your loan. Some are one-time fees, while others reoccur over the life of the loan. When you apply for your loan, you will receive a Good Faith Estimate of Settlement Charges, and a booklet that will explain these costs in detail.
 
Title Insurance: When you purchase your home, both you and the lender need a preliminary title commitment that will indicate exactly what recorded liens, encumbrances and recorded easements are currently in effect on the property. The title commitment will also indicate the vested owner of record and any restrictions on the use of the property. Title insurance is, for all practical purposes, required on all property and, in Teton County, it is the seller's expense. However, a buyer getting a mortgage is required to furnish the lender with a lender's policy showing the lender as lien holder on that property. These charges will be incurred at the time of settlement as a part of your closing costs. When the purchase of the property is closed, and the title company has recorded the necessary documents, the title company will then issue a title insurance policy binder to you and the lender, showing clear title to the property.
 
Loan Origination Fee: This fee covers the lender's administrative costs in processing the loan. It is a one-time fee, often expressed as a percentage of the loan. The origination fee is typically 1% of the loan, but remember, you can obtain a loan with no origination fee and a slightly higher interest rate.
 
Loan Discount: Often called "points", a loan discount is a one-time charge used to adjust the yield on the loan to what market conditions demand. One point is equal to 1% of the loan amount. This fee is rare when interest rates are low.
 
Appraisal Fee: This is a one-time fee that pays for an appraisal, which is a statement of property value viewed by the lender. The appraisal is made by an independent fee appraiser and can cost a standard $700 to $800, or more, depending on the home's size and location.
 
Credit Report Fee: This one-time fee covers the cost of the credit report that is run by an independent credit reporting agency and is usually about $60-$75.
 
Title Insurance Fee: There are two title policies: a lender's title policy (which protects the lender against loss due to defects on title) and a buyer's title policy (which protects you). These are both one-time charges, but the one you usually pay as a buyer is typically under $500.
 
Miscellaneous Title Charges: The title company may charge fees for a title search, title examination, document preparation, notary fees, recording fees, and a settlement or closing fee. These are all one-time charges and can add up to about $250.
 
Document Prep Fee: There may be a separate, one-time fee that covers preparation of the final legal papers, including the note and deed of trust. These legal documents run about $150.
 
Lender Fees: Other lender fees include an underwriting fee, a flood certification fee, an amortization schedule fee, and other miscellaneous fees that should be disclosed by your mortgage lender at loan application. These fees vary dramatically from about $450 to $900.
 
Prepaid Interest: Depending on the time of month your loan closes, this charge may vary from a full month's interest to just a few days' interest. If your loan closes at the beginning of the month, you will probably have to pay the maximum amount. If your loan closes at the end of the month, you will only have to pay a few days' interest.
 
PMI (Private Mortgage Insurance) Premium: Depending on the amount of your down payment, you may have to pay an up-front fee for mortgage insurance (which protects the lender against loss due to foreclosure). You may also be required to put a certain amount into a special reserve account (an impound account) held by the lender for PMI.
 
Beginning of the Escrow Account: Your lender will typically have an account where your property taxes and property insurance will be held. This account will be started with taxes approximately equal to two months in excess of the number of months that have elapsed this year. (If 6 months have passed, they will collect 8 months of taxes.) Your property insurance will be collected one year in advance, plus two months will be kept in your escrow account.
 
 Keep in mind, in the event that you do not qualify with a lender for a new loan, the earnest money is refunded to you, provided the sellers are given written notice, within the designated time frame, regarding the lender's disapproval, and provided you have supplied the lender with all documentation they have requested.
 
There's certainly a lot to know! Have additional questions? Click here and let us know how we can help!

Whether you’re relocating to Jackson Hole, or want to buy a vacation home, primary residence, second home, resort property, condo, townhome, land, horse property, Teton view home, golf estate or ski-in/ski-out home, you’ll find all Jackson, Wilson, and Teton Village real estate listed for sale here. You need an advocate, a buyer's agent to represent your best interest, with confidentiality, Teri will you acquire a Jackson Hole property for your 1031 exchange, investment, second home or future retirement.  Take advantage of the many tax benefits of Wyoming residency. Already own a home in Jackson Hole?  Interested in knowing the value in today's market? Thinking about selling? Talk with Teri about creative marketing to attract qualified buyers for your home.  Teri McCarthy is the Broker/Owner of Jackson Wyoming Real Estate.  Teri holds the designations of ABR (Accredited Buyer Representative), CRS (Certified Residential Specialist) and RSPS (Resort and Second Home Specialist) matching buyers and sellers with Jackson Hole properties since 1989. All rights reserved 2015 Teri McCarthy Inc and Teri McCarthy, Realtor, ABR, CRS, RSPS.